Nonfiction Text Features {Trading Spaces Tuesday}

Hi everyone!  I'm not home today...instead I am posting about making inferences over at Reading Toward the Stars.  But before you head over there, make sure to check out the post below!  Carla from Comprehension Connection has stopped by to post about nonfiction text structures.

trading spaces badge

Hello readers!  As you can see from the graphic at the top of this post, we are switching things up a bit.  Jessica has hopped over to Reading Toward the Stars to post about making inferences, and Andrea from Reading Toward the Stars has snagged my blog, Comprehension Connection, to talk about Reader's Theater, and  I am Carla from Comprehension Connection dropping by Literacy Spark to talk about a few teaching strategies I've used with nonfiction text structures.  This is a follow up post to a mentor text linky I participated in last week where I shared mentor texts for each nonfiction text structure.  If you're interested in grabbing the list of books as well as the handouts I shared, you can get that post {here}.

For today's post, I am going to share additional resources I've used to model and practice text structure with my students.  To introduce the text structures, I love using Youtube clips.  The first video clip is very thorough, and readers may prefer to pause the clip, make anchor charts, and/or use copies of articles to further explain the text structures, before continuing to the next segment.
Of the videos I looked at on Youtube, this video seemed the most comprehensive and included specific examples. I also liked these from LearningZillion.
Students may find it helpful to refer to this handout created by Laurie Thisius as examples are shown and take note of the signal words that are used within the articles.
To help solidify the information with more concrete examples, I loved using {this handout} from J Bernhard.  I cut apart the articles, and I had my students work in pairs to analyze them.  I also used this freebie from Melissa Gill.  Students need to explain their thinking which has been an emphasis in my classroom.  
This freebie from The Science Penguin was also quite useful recently since our fifth graders do a full study of oceans in science.  Giving students another exposure to those key concepts reinforces science learning and reading skills.  
Nonfiction Text Structures Ocean Activities
I hope you've found this information helpful and can utilize the ideas in teaching nonfiction text structures to your students.  Identifying them helps students hone in on the key ideas which is especially important with testing and general comprehension.  

Thanks so much for visiting Literacy Spark today, and thank you Jessica for allowing me to share these ideas with your readers.  If my blog is new to you, I'd love for you to drop by and check out the info I've posted.  To add me to your Bloglovin list, here's my blog link. 
http://www.bloglovin.com/en/blog/8172757
Have a great week literacy fans, and until next time, happy reading!

4 comments

  1. I have really been working on text structures with my students. It is so important for students to understand them to help better understand nonfiction. Thank you for the links to the resources!

    Andrea
    Reading Toward the Stars

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for commenting Andrea. I'm glad you can use the links.

      Delete
  2. You always have such wonderfully informative posts! That's why I've nominated you for The Sunshine Blogger Award. Check out my post for details :)
    Erin
    Short and Sassy Teacher

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love the ocean text features! Thanks for the freebie!!

    :)
    Beach Bum Literacy Chick
    Beachbumliteracychick.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete

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