Mentor Text Linky {Social Studies}


My living room looks like this right now. Sorry it's so dark, it's early still here. How sad that I look at ALL these books (over 60 bins of them) and think about the ones I still need!  For example, I don't have enough books on sports for my boys, I need procedural texts, and would like some more books that match particular series...my husband thinks I'm crazy!



I was all set to link up with one of my favorite books to use to teach inferring today and then this morning I realized it is a social studies mentor text week.  I've been having a hard time remembering what books I have to teach sic/ss since I don't teach those subjects anymore...but since they are all over the floor I picked something out.





This is a book that I was introduced to in my Master's class on multicultural literature.  I haven't used it with my second graders, I think the story is engaging enough for them but I just haven't found a place for it.  I'm not sure what grades teach about racial discrimination, but it would be perfect for that as well as just exposing your children to the idea that they can accomplish anything no matter who they are and what they have to over come.

The book is the true story of the life of Asian American Olympic gold medalist Sammy Lee.  


It starts off with Sammy Lee as a young boy wanting desperately to use the pool in his community, but not being allowed to except for one day a week, because of his color.  He took a liking to diving and decided he wanted to become an Olympian.  However, his father expected him to become a doctor.  He worked with a diving coach throughout school and continued to encounter experiences of discrimination.  His dad allowed him to dive so long as he agreed to attend medical school.  After his father's death, he did in fact become a doctor after enlisting in an army training program.  He eventually did make it to the Olympics and won a gold medal, proving to himself and the world that skin color did not matter.

Below is a brief biography offered at the end of the book:


Which reminds me, that I also need to work on adding more multicultural literature to my classroom library. :)



Make sure to link up with me and share the details of when you officially go back to school, when your students come back, etc.  Click on the icon above to find the post!




6 comments

  1. This book looks fantastic! Thank you for the suggestion. I need to add more multicultural books to my "stock" as well. (My office looks similar to your floor...covered in books)

    Hunter's Tales from Teaching

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  2. I have never heard of this book and love the story. I need to add this to my list. I too have too few multicutural books.

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  3. Wow this looks like a great book! I have never heard of it!

    Wow, that's a lot of books!!! Sorry it wasn't LA this week but thanks for linking up!!

    Amanda
    Collaboration Cuties

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  4. Wow! This looks like a great book. I think the kids would really connect with it. Thanks for sharing. :)
    ~Brandee
    Creating Lifelong Learners
    Follow me on Bloglovin'

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  5. Wow! You have a great collection of books!
    What an inspiring story. I think that anything that makes students think beyond their own world and encourages empathy, is wonderful.
    Fabulous Fifth Grade Fun

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